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Harley-Davidson’s Electric Flat Track Gets a New Look

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When Harley-Davidson showed its design concepts for its future electric motorcycles, we were struck by the Bar & Shield’s plans for a road-going flat track bike…for two reasons.

For starters, the design and vehicle format seemed promising. In fact, it was surprising that it took an electric powertrain to get Harley-Davidson hip to its flat track roots and then apply them to the company’s street-bike offerings.

The second reason our interests were piqued was because of the bike’s very obvious use of Alta’s EV powertrain components, which made sense at the time since Harley-Davidson was a major investor in the electric motorcycle startup.

While we all know how that story ended, what wasn’t clear was what would become of the electric flat track concept. Oddly enough, we only have to stroll through the pages of the Harley-Davidson website to find out.


This is because the iconic American motorcycle company has updated its pages with this new concept for its small-ish electric street bike (shown above). And well, it looks quite good too.

While the overall design has gotten a refresh, the most notable change is the battery pack, which is definitely not a carbon copy of what came from Alta, and instead looks very similar to what is on the Livewire.

The bike looks more sporty too, thanks to a more swept seat and a side-mounted number plate. We aren’t too sure about Harley-Davidson’s headlight choice…since we have a hard time not thinking about Bender from Futurama, but overall the package looks right and tight.

While Harley-Davidson was premature in announcing many of its new motorcycle models, we are closing in on the time where the Bar & Shield brand will be releasing a plethora of new and non-cruiser machines per its new “More Roads to Harley-Davidson” campaign. As such, stay tuned.

Source: Harley-Davidson via Motorrad

Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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