Bikes

2015 Suzuki GSX-S1000 – How To Sell Leftover GSX-R’s

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A bike we spotted in Southern California shooting a commercial, we already knew to expect the 2015 Suzuki GSX-S1000 at the INTERMOT show this week. Built around the same inline-four engine that was found in the 2008 Suzuki GSX-R1000, the GSX-S1000 has been tuned for street use, though Suzuki isn’t exactly talking key figures.

Proving that it’s not selling just a rebadged GSX-R, Suzuki has built an all-new aluminum frame chassis for GSX-S1000, with an eye on making the machine more of a roadster than a streetfighter.

Also of note is the addition of a three-way selectable traction control system, something even the GSX-R1000 doesn’t have. ABS is available, but only on the aptly named Suzuki GSX-S1000.

Suspension work is done by a KYB shock that has adjustable preload and rebound, as well as fully-adjustable forks up front. Braking is done by Brembo monoblock calipers, radially mounted at the front, as is now the standard in the motorcycle world.

Not an entirely robust machine, though quite the looker, it will be interesting to see how Suzuki prices the 2015 Suzuki GSX-S1000 in the American and European markets. Clearly not up to the task of taking on the more refined roadsters and streetfighters on the market, the Suzuki GSX-S1000 could be a good bargain bike, if the price is right.

While the Japanese company has shown some life with the 2015 Suzuki V-Strom 650XT adventure bike, the rest of the company’s offerings continue the trend of “bold new graphics” and parts-bin-specials, the latter being the case with the “new” Suzuki GSX-S1000.



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Source: Suzuki

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Jensen Beeler

Despite his best efforts, Jensen is called one of the most influential bloggers in the motorcycle industry, and sometimes consults for motorcycle companies, whether they've solicited his expertise or not.

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