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BMW Motorrad USA is recalling a few of its maxi-scooters, with a safety campaign touching the BMW C600 Sport and C650 Sport (2013-2018), as well as the BMW C650 GT (2013-2019 scooters).

In total, the recall affects 2,707 scooters, and it centers around the fact that repeated turnings of the handlebar to the left can cause the front brake hose to crack and leak over time. 

This of course can lead to the brake’s hydraulic system losing pressure, which can lead to the brakes no longer working. This safety issue has lead to the recall announcement by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Oh yes, my friends…it is another BMW recall. We have seen seven recalls from the Bavarian brand over the recent months (#1, #2, #3#4, #5, and #6 here) – a comedy of both serious and minor errors by the German company and its two-wheeled products.

This time around, the issue is of the “oops” variety, with the BMW 2014-2016 F800GT and 2015-2016 F800R being tagged for improper reflectors, which fail to meet Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) number 108, “Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Associated Equipment.”

In total, the recall will affect 1,478 motorcycle units, and pertains to the rear-side reflectors not be properly visible in certain traffic conditions.

If you’ve been following BMW Motorrad’s worldwide recall of over 300,000+ motorcycles, for faulty rear-wheel mounting flanges; well the recall has finally hit American shores, affecting over 43,000 units.

The basic gist of the recall is that on the affected motorcycles, the rear wheel mounting flange may crack if the rear wheel mounting bolts are over-tightened. This would cause the rear wheel to come off the motorcycle, which would of course likely result in a crash.

BMW Motorrad USA will notify possibly affected owners, and BMW dealers will replace the existing aluminum rear wheel flange with a new steel one, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin April 21, 2015.

Concerned owners may contact BMW customer service at 1-800-525-7417, and as always the NHTSA is also available at 1-888-327-4236 and safercar.gov.

You can find the full list of affected motorcycles, after the jump.

BMW Motorrad has announced that it is recalling over 122,000 motorcycles worldwide for a potentially leaking front brake. The recall seems to only affect K1200GT, R1200R, R1200RT, R1200ST, R1200GS, and R1200GS Adventure motorcycles that were manufactured between August 2006 and May 2009.

Of these bikes, only ~100 units have been found to have the reported brake leak, but BMW isn’t taking chances with the other roughly 121,900 motorcycles that are out on the raod, and is ordering a worldwide recall on the potentially afftected models.

Generally speaking, when you see a recall for an engine item on a motorcycle, like a connecting rod, it is a big deal. Such recalls have caught a few brands out, and it usually means a large investment of time and energy on the part of the OEM.

Some brands make complete engine swaps, while others will pay their technicians to make the appropriate fixes and repairs. Invariably customers aren’t happy with the solution, and it is not out of the question to hear talk about lawsuits and other legal remedies.

Today’s case though, well it is a bit different. BMW Motorrad has found that the connecting rods on the BMW F850GS may not have been installed correctly. But, the recall only affects one motorcycle…and it hasn’t even been sold yet.

I don’t think we have ever seen a recall for just one motorcycle before here at Asphalt & Rubber, let alone one that hasn’t been sold by a dealer, but here we are.

Both of BMW Motorrad’s tiniest bikes are the victims of the German brand’s latest recall, as both models suffer from an issue with their chassis. In total, 2,376 motorcycles are affected by this recall.

According to recall documents filed with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the G310 platform has an issue with its frame and/or its kickstand, where repeated use or loading of the kickstand can see it become damaged.

Over time, the section of the frame that encases the kickstand bushing could eventually break, which could lead to an injury of the rider and/or passenger. As such, a recall has been started for the two motorcycle models.

Mark this as the sixth recall (#1, #2, #3#4, #5 here) that BMW Motorrad has had to issue in the United States, as the German brand has seen a number of its models run afoul of DOT and NHTSA standards.

This time around, BMW’s headache stems from its accessory turn signals, which may not be sufficiently visible to other drivers, and as such, they fail to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) number 108, “Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Associated Equipment.”

In total, this recall affects 9,000 units, which fit a bevy of motorcycles in the BMW Motorrad lineup.

BMW is up to its fifth recall, in just five weeks, with a bevy of models been hit with safety concerns. The first recall was for the German company’s flagship model, the BMW R1200GS, which could see its front suspension fail if the motorcycle was subjected to hard use.

The second recall affected BMW models that shipped with panniers, as they did not meet federal requirements for vehicle reflectors. The third recall was for BMW R1200RT Police models, while the fourth recall concerned the wheels on two of BMW’s scooter models.

Today marked BMW’s fifth recall, which affects over 3,000 units of its BMW R nineT roadster model, as they could suffer from a swingarm pivot point pin coming loose.

With the news of all these recalls, BMW Motorrad USA has also sent a letter to its dealers, outlining the status of each recall, how BMW is going to help dealers through this massive slew of recalls, and what the brand will do for its affected customers.

Today we have news of the fifth (#1, #2, #3, & #4 here) BMW Motorrad recall in roughly a month’s time, as 3,368 units of the BMW R nineT (2014-2017 model years) are being recalled for swingarm pivot pin bolt that may loosen itself.

The issue stems from a supplier production process error, where one or more bolts that connect the right-side pivot pin to the frame may loosen as a result of an improper specification of the chamfer cutting process in the frame. 

As a result, proper clamp force may not have been achieved during final torqueing process. If the right-hand side pivot pin to the frame loosens itself, it can affect the handling and stability of the motorcycle, which increases the chances of a crash.