MSF Updates Its Basic RiderCourse Curriculum

It is no surprise that statistics from the NHTSA show that motorcycle accidents and injuries are on the rise. According to the 2012 Motor Vehicle Crash report published by the NHTSA, motorcycle fatalities for that year rose to 4,957, up seven percent from 2011, while injuries increased 15% to 93,000. While the NHTSA statistics are misleading because the motorcycle category includes mopeds, scooters, three-wheelers, pocket bikes, mini bikes, and off-road vehicles, new riders need every advantage they can afford. The Motorcycle Safety Foundation has taken notice of these statistics and has revised the curriculum for its Basic RiderCourse to include a new Basic eCourse, which students will take prior to in-person instruction.

Yamaha Trademarks “R1S” & “R1M” at USPTO – “YZF-R1M” Trademarked Abroad – But Why?

Are new Yamaha YZF-R1 models coming down the pipe? That’s the question being asked after trademark filings in the US and abroad tipped off Yamaha Motor’s intention to use “R1S”, “R1M”, and “YZF-R1M” for motorcycle, scooter, and three-wheeled purposes. The filings are being taken as hints towards a possible multiple trim levels of the Yamaha YZF-R1 superbike, with the “S” and “M” designations being different spec machines than the current base model. The “S” nomenclature is a popular one in the two and four-wheeled world, though “M” would certainly be a novel designation, outside of say…BMW.

Bell & COTA Create Texas-Themed Limited-Edition Helmet

Continuing its theme of making limited-edition helmets for premier-class US rounds, Bell Helmets has teamed up with the Circuit of the Americas and Chris Wood, of Airtrix, to create a Texas-themed Bell Star Carbon helmet, just in time for COTA’s MotoGP race next weekend. Available only until April 13th, the Bell/COTA helmet features a red, white, and blue flag motif on the front, with both the American and State of Texas flags visible, which then wrap around the rear to merge with a hardwood design, reminiscent of the floorboards in a Western saloon. The helmet is also crowned with a Longhorn cattle skull, which adds to the Texan motif. The specially designed helmet also features a horseshoe, the COTA logo, and the 2014 Red Bull MotoGP of The Americas logo.

Aprilia Mounting a Return to MotoGP in 2016

Towards the end of the 800cc era, MotoGP looked to be in dire condition. Grids were dwindling, factories were reducing their participation, and teams were in difficult financial straits indeed. By the end of 2011, there were just 17 full time entries, Suzuki was down to a single rider, and were about to pull out entirely for 2012. How different the situation looks today. In a recent interview with the official MotoGP.com website, Aprilia Corse’s new boss Romano Albesiano gave a brief outline of their plans. The Italian factory will continue to work with the IODA Racing team for 2014 to collect data on the electronics and tires, which they will use as input on an entirely new project being worked on for 2016.

This Is Pretty Much What the Monster 800 Will Look Like

With the advent of the Ducati Monster 1200, it was only a matter of time before Ducati’s middleweight liquid-cooled “Monster 800″ would be spotted, and unsurprisingly the machines have a great deal in common. The one big difference seems to be that the 821cc Monster gets a double-sided swingarm, which has become Ducati’s new way of differentiating between its big and medium displacement models of the same machine, see entry for Ducati 899 Panigale. With the spied Ducati Monster 800 looking ready for primetime, and a pre-fall launch isn’t out of the question. Giving us an excellent glimpse into what the Ducati Monster 800 would look like, Luca Bar has again used his Photoshop skills to render up images of the still unreleased “baby” Monster.

Photos of the Mugen Shinden Ni sans Fairings

Given the competitive nature of the electric racing realm, its rare to see the big high-power bikes without their fairings, as teams are reluctant to reveal their secret sauce. Debuting the Mugen Shinden San this past weekend in Tokyo though, Team Mugen did just that, giving us a glimpse into the inner workings of the team’s 2013 race bike, the Mugen Shinden Ni. You don’t have to be an electron-head to get excited by these photos, as any race bike with a carbon fiber frame and swingarm is pretty drool-worthy, though the Shinden Ni’s carbon fiber battery enclosure does hide a great deal of the electric superbike’s geek factor. While the sheer size of the battery bike is impressive, it was expected when the Shinden was first announced.

Mugen Shinden San (神電 参) Electric Superbike Revealed

Mugen’s third purpose-built electric superbike for the Isle of Man TT, the Mugen Shinden San, has been revealed in Japan. Campaigning two machines for this year’s TT Zero race, Mugen has John McGuiness and Bruce Anstey at the helm of its “Shinden San” bikes, as the duo looks for a one-two finish in this year’s race. With MotoCzysz not racing at the Isle of Man this year, Mugen is a hot favorite to take the top podium spots, as well as crack the 110 mph barrier for electrics on the historic Snaefell Mountain Course (Mugen is targeting a 115 mph lap). An evolution on the company’s previous designs, the Shinden San fits 134hp — 10hp more than last year, thanks to a new smaller three-phase brushless motor provided by Mission Motors — into its 529lbs bulk.

Trackside Tuesday: The Winning Personality of Jack Miller

Chatting with a couple of NASCAR fans recently, I was reminded that any competition is boring if you don’t care who wins. But if you do care, then even cars driving around in circles can be very compelling entertainment. Those NASCAR fans really cared about how their favorite drivers finished, and not only how they finished in the latest race, but what and how those drivers were doing off the track as well. Those fans had been captured by the personalities of those drivers. One of the things NASCAR does well is sell personalities. All major sports-related businesses do this to some extent, but some organizations do it better than others.

Living the Dream – A Photographer’s Story: Qatar

Imagine if just for once you didn’t have to stick to your usual nine-to-five job. Instead you were able to do the one job you’ve always wanted to do, but any number of things (it’s usually money) have stood in the way. This is exactly the situation I found myself in six months ago when the company I had worked at, for the last 14 years, decided to close, making everyone redundant. This decision did not come as a surprise; in fact, I had been hanging around for the last few years hoping that it would happen, as I had a plan. Fast-forward six months and I have just finished photographing the opening round of the 2014 MotoGP World Championship in Qatar. The plan is starting to unfold.

Fuel or Electronics? Where Are Nicky Hayden & Scott Redding Losing Out on the Honda RCV1000R?

The news that Honda would be building a production racer to compete in MotoGP aroused much excitement among fans. There was much speculation over just how quick it would be, and whether it would be possible for a talented rider to beat the satellite bikes on some tracks. In the hands of active MotoGP riders, the gap was around 2 seconds at the Sepang tests. Nicky Hayden – of whom much had been expected, not least by himself – had made significant improvements, especially on corner entry. The difference in performance and the big gap to the front has been cause for much speculation. Where are the Honda production racers losing out to the Factory Option bikes?

What MotoGP Can Learn From F1: The Business Symposium

11/25/2012 @ 3:52 pm, by David Emmett7 COMMENTS

What MotoGP Can Learn From F1: The Business Symposium Circuit of the Americas Formula One Red Bull Keith Rizzo

Since the global financial crisis struck back in 2008, MotoGP’s primary focus has been on cutting costs. These efforts have met with varying success – sometimes reducing costs over the long-term, after a short-term increase, sometimes having no discernible impact whatsoever – and as a result, the grids in all three classes are filling up again.

Further changes are afoot – chiefly, the promise by Honda and Yamaha to supply cheaper machinery to private teams, either in the form of production racers, such as Honda’s RC213V clone, or Yamaha’s offer to lease engines to chassis builders – but there is a limit to how much can be achieved by cutting costs. What is really needed is for the series to raise its revenues, something which the series has signally failed to do.

In truth, the series has never really recovered from the loss of tobacco sponsorship, something for which it should have been prepared, given that it had had many years’ warning of the ruling finally being applied.

The underlying problem was that the raising of sponsorship had been outsourced and the marketing of the series had been outsourced to a large degree to the tobacco companies, and once they left – with the honorable, if confusing, exception of Philip Morris – those skills disappeared with them. There was nobody left to try to increase the amount of money coming into the sport.

To its credit, Dorna have tried to address this issue, even going so far as to organize a sponsorship symposium with the teams last year. Unfortunately, it was far from a success, with one attendee being particularly scathing about it when asked for his impressions.

And because of the scarcity of sponsorship, Dorna has the regrettable tendency to regard itself in competition with the teams trying to bring sponsors into the series, rather than working in concert with them to raise the total income and reduce the dependence of the teams on Dorna subsidy.

MotoGP’s four-wheeled counterpart, F1, has a far better track record of raising sponsorship, in part because of its deeper roots in the business community. So it came as no surprise that when F1 came to the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas the circuit’s owners – also well-known in the business community, with Red McCombs being a leading figure in Texan business, and one of the richest men on the planet – organized a forum to educate the Texas business community about the opportunities which motorsports present, and to allow the community to meet and network with top figures from F1. The event was judged a success, and a positive initiative taken by the circuit.

This is exactly the kind of initiative that is desperately needed by the motorcycle racing community as well. The idea of a business club or symposium is far from new – part of Ducati’s success in raising sponsorship to cover its costs is through working with the Italian business community to convince them of the opportunities MotoGP and WSBK has to offer, while Lucio Cecchinello leverages his business network on a smaller scale – but it has not been sufficiently exploited by either Dorna or the teams to help to increase interest in the sport. Dorna’s job – especially now that it runs both MotoGP and World Superbikes – must be to raise the profile of motorcycle racing as a whole, and try to increase interest and investment in the sport from outside businesses.

Given the fact that key players from the major manufacturers, teams and Dorna are present at race tracks around the world, there is a golden opportunity to be seized, if Dorna would only take the lead. Organizing symposium, or business clubs, or networking events at each race, and inviting local and national business leaders to attend them is a key stepping stone to a more stable future for motorcycle racing, reducing the dependence both on TV income, and on the willingness of the factories to continue racing.

It is not even limited to MotoGP’s managers and leaders: fans too can help. If you work for a large company, make sure the people in the marketing department where you work are aware of the value which MotoGP and World Superbikes represent, and the potential audience which it can reach. There are a few key numbers up on the MotoGP.com website, which provide enough information to start a conversation.

I am personally aware of one particularly innovative initiative, with a small outside company exploring ways to get an outside (and non-obvious) industry involved in motorcycle racing. Unfortunately again, it is being driven by the passion of the people involved, and not receiving the kind of support it should from Dorna.

For the past four years, the sport of motorcycle racing has been looking inwards, seeking ways and areas of cutting costs. It is time to start looking outwards, at seeking out partners, promoting the sport, and increasing investment and sponsorship in the sport. The opportunities are out there, and the examples of good practice are there to be followed.

If Dorna spent more of its efforts on organizing business symposiums such as the one organized by the Circuit of the Americas, and emulating the efforts such as LCR Honda’s Inspire magazine, an attempt to create a lifestyle magazine around which to offer more opportunities to partners and sponsors, the sport as a whole would be a great deal better off. We might even be able to start attracting new manufacturers into the sport, persuading them to see it as a marketing opportunity, rather than an R&D cost center.

Below is the press release about the MotorSport Business Forum from the Austin circuit:

MotorSport Business Forum: Texas Symposium 2012

AUSTIN, Texas (Nov. 19, 2012) – Formula One returns to American soil this weekend and not a minute too soon.

To mark its return, KHP and its long-standing partner, the MotorSport Business Forum (MSBF), supported by payment solutions experts Rêv Worldwide, hosted the inaugural Texas Business Symposium in Austin, Texas on behalf of Red McCombs and Bobby Epstein, co-founders and investors of the Circuit of The Americas.

Operating this year within the more intimate format of a Texas Business Symposium, the MSBF sought to educate Texas companies on the commercial benefits of motorsport involvement by engaging with experienced motorsport sponsors and technical partners as well as allowing international motorsport participants to gain a better understanding of the business environment and opportunities that exist in Austin and central Texas.

Hosted at the AT&T Center at the University of Texas in Austin, central Texan business leaders of today and tomorrow were joined by some of Formula One’s leading figures on the eve of the United States Grand Prix. The 200 plus congregation of delegates from both the regional business world and that of Formula One were testament to the joint excitement of the sport’s return to US soil, and in particular to Austin,Texas.

Red McCombs, founder of McCombs Partners and co-founder of Circuit of The Americas, whose name adorns the hosts’ School of Business, opened the inauguaral Texas Business Symposium with a heartfelt speech the day before his dream of a US Grand Prix in Austin becomes a reality.

This was followed by the CEO of Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team, Nick Fry’s keynote address that set the tone for the afternoon’s proceedings: Formula One sees Austin as the new, permanent home of the US Grand Prix. This feeling was reciprocated in the ensuing Q&A session which saw an enthusiastic reaction and postive exchange of ideas and views from both the podium and the gathered delegates, further enforcing the positive vibe that has seen Formula One welcomed so enthusiastically by the Austin business community.

Roy Sosa , founder, Chairman and CEO of Rêv Worldwide was clear in his support of this important gathering, stating: ‘Rêv is proud to welcome the MotorSport Business Forum to Austin, Texas. Our partnership represents an opportunity for business innovation that goes beyond technology and the track. The intersection of the entrepreneurial spirit in this city combined with the global reach already represented by this sport opens new business partnerships and product development ideas never seen before.’

Paul Hembery, Pirelli Motorsport Director, added ‘It has been a pleasure and a unique experience to participate in the inaugural Motorsport Business Forum in Austin. The United States are an important market, not only for Formula One, but for all the sponsors and partners involved in the sport. For Pirelli Formula One is a unique global platform to showcase our products and standards of technology. The Forum is certainly a great way to help bring the sport and its philosophy a bit closer to the decision makers of American companies and events like these will help the sport to establish itself in the States and to be successful. Hopefully, this Forum is the first of many in Austin and in other locations around the world.’

The final word of the day was left to Circuit of the Americas’ founding partner, and driving force behind the move to bring Formula One back to the United States, Bobby Epstein.

Katja Heim, CEO of event co-organisers KHP Consulting, was delighted with the reaction of all who attended the symposium, saying: ‘The success of the symposium clearly demonstrates there is an appetite in the US market to explore the many commercial opportunities that F1 has to offer. As with previous Forums KHP has helped to organise, the first and most important step is always bringing the right people together in the right environment.’

The full list of speakers – made up of Team Heads, Stakeholders, Series officials, Sponsors and Commercial Directors – were as follows:

  • Red McCombs, Founder of McCombs Partners and co-founder of Circuit of The Americas – Welcome Address
  • Nick Fry, CEO Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team – Keynote Address
  • Paul Hembery, Head of Pirelli Motorsport
  • Roy Sosa , founder, Chairman and CEO of Rêv Worldwide
  • Geoff McGrath, Managing Director of McLaren Applied Technologies
  • Mehul Kapadia, Vice President of Commercial Alliances and Sponsorships and Tata Communications.
  • Graeme Lowdon – President & Sporting Director at Marussia F1 Team
  • Pablo de Villota, Formula 1 Sponsorship Manager at Banco Santander
  • Bobby Epstein, Co-founder and Chairman at Circuit of The Americas

Photo: © 2012 Keith Rizzo / Circuit of the Americas – All Rights Reserved

This article was originally published on MotoMatters, and is republished here on Asphalt & Rubber with permission by the author.

Comment:

  1. Nice summary, David. I would agree that F1 does a better job, for the most part, than MotoGP. It’s worth mentioning, I think, that F1 is driven primarily by individual teams rather than manufacturers. In MotoGP, it’s pretty much the other way around. There are pros and cons to both approaches, but the bottom line is that investors need to feel that they get their money’s worth and the teams need to ensure that the price of admission for sponsorship is not excessive. There needs to be a recognizable ROI. Simply having a logo on a bike isn’t really gonna cut it at the end of the day.

    Both the teams and advertisers need to work together.

  2. KSW says:

    David,

    Well written. The marketing of a series is indeed the responsibility of the rights owner, in this case, Dorna. AMA also suffers the same issue of doing little to nothing to promote and manage the brand.
    In both cases there are large financial companies and I’m not talking Bridgepoint involved with these teams whether that be where assetts are managed or accounting done. Why shouldn’t they be looked at as potential sponsors. The demographics of the riders and their personalities are surely in the right age group as well as marketable. Sunglass, clothing, bicycle, surfing are all companies that need to be shown the excitement of the races and the riders especially after a win that could be wrapped around a video campaign. Think those review and highlight video’s are exciting? Create the same thing with a pair of sunglasses or a rider lapping the track on his bicycle with him lapping the track in a race.
    It’s really a shame that the powers at the top are seemingly so lost in the lifestyle at the top they’ve forgotten what it takes to truly manage and maintain a successful brand. Almost like the trust fund baby driving a Range Rover who will never work as hard as the parent who created the wealth to being with. Sorry about that reference but I’m in Miami for Thanksgiving.

    Kevin

  3. KSW says:

    “who created that wealth to begin with” sorry but no editing in these comments can result in errors.

  4. TexusTim says:

    Great article, I hope cota does the same thing for the moto gp round in april, as allways with motocycle sports it lags behind the 4 wheel cagers in every way, it is common that the enthusist does the heavy lifting in our sport, hopefully that will change and a new credability will come….alot of this has to do with promotion…tv being the most imprtant if 2 wheel motorsports are pushed there sponsors will follow….just that would be a big help…but please no more reality shows.

  5. TexusTim says:

    BRING BACK GREG AND TWO WHEEL TUESDAY ! that show on speed did more than anyone reconised to promote two wheel racing…..that show was better than all the reality crap speed drudged up over the years…..sorry no edit so double post.

  6. F1 is a hell of a lot more competitive than it was back in the late 90s, when Ferrari had a virtual lock on pole position and race wins. They’ve done quite a bit to improve the ability of cars to pass, admittedly through electronic and aerodynamic gimmickry, but it works pretty well and they’ve added an interesting component to the races.

    But F1 is also rife with problems and issues, fiefdoms, political infighting over turf and control, the usual stuff in racing, but one of the primary issues is how fast and how often the rules change. For a while there things were really ridiculous, like the whole season where they could only use one set of tires per race, qualifying and practice, or the ridiculous grooved tires to decreased traction. Thankfully those calling the shots in the series came to their senses. But still the average person certainly can’t keep up with all the technical reading required to understand the changes that come every year and often midseason. Also there is so much secrecy in the technical area that nobody outside the teams really know what’s going on. It is definitely the sport of billionaires, and has very little appeal to the masses particularly in the US, much like motorcycle racing.

    I must say I’m impressed with the Circuit of the Americas, that is one hell of a track, certainly among the top five circuits in the Western Hemisphere, and perhaps the top 10 in the world. I’d love to spend the day doing laps on that sucker with a 200 hp Ducati or Aprilia.

  7. Brian J says:

    You give F1 too much credit for COTA success with sponsorships. The key was Red’s action with local businesses. F1 and Bernie had little or nothing to do with starting this. AAron B is right about the politics rife in F1 too that criples it from time to time. I used to believe that Moto-GP and F1 drove the bloody edge of tech in our transportation. Now I can buy a Honda that has more tech in it than either sport put together. Sad.