MV Agusta F3 800 Ago Now Officially Debuts

We already announced the bike last November, and brought you a bevy of hi-res images of the special edition machine. Although now that we think of it, MV Agusta never released anything on this Giacomo Agostini tribute motorcycle — better late than never, right? Back at the EICMA show launch, where the MV Agusta F3 800 Ago was first shown to the public (and Agostini himself), the Varese brand promised us two additional motorcycle launches in early 2014. MV Agsuta made good on half that promise with the Dragster 800 model, hopefully this Ago special edition isn’t the other half of that statement, and MV Agusta still has something waiting in the wings. That being said, the Tricolore & Gold paint scheme is gorgeous, and looks even better in person.

Isle of Man TT Gets TV Deal for Australia & USA

Want to watch the Isle of Man TT from the comfort of your non-British TV, but haven’t been able to in the past? A new TV from the Isle of Man’s Department of Economic Development will do just that. Inking a new TV contract with North One TV, the Isle of Man TT will be televised in the American, Australian, and of course British markets, making it easier than ever to watch the iconic road race. With a five-year contract with the Velocity Channel in the US, the American cable channel will show seven one-hour race shows. Each segment will air within 24hrs of each race, and be tailored for the American market.

Castiglioni Denies Fiat Buyout of MV Agusta Is in the Works

After reporting 22% growth in Q1 2014, Giovanni Castiglioni had some closing words about the rumors that Fiat could acquire MV Agusta — a popular rumor that has been swirling around in the press the last two months. Denying outright that MV Agusta had, or was in, talks with the Fiat-Chrysler group about an acquisition (some reports linked even MV Agusta to being bought by Fiat-owned Ferrari), Castiglioni said the Italian company solely was focused on building growth, and building motorcycles. “Moreover, I’d like to take this opportunity to deny rumours circulated by the media over the last few days concerning supposed negotiations vis-à-vis the sale of a share of MV Agusta to the Fiat-Chrysler Group,” said Giovanni Castiglioni, the President and CEO of MV Agusta.

A 2WD Hybrid-Electric Motorcycle for the US Military?

In the coming years, US special forces may be riding a tw0-wheel drive, hybrid-electric, multi-fuel motorcycle co-developed by BRD Motorcycles and Logos Technologies. Helping make this project possible is a Small Business Innovation Research grant from DARPA. The goal is to make a single-track vehicle for US expeditionary and special forces that will be nearly silent in operation, yet also capable of traveling long distances. Details on the proposed machine are light, of course, but it sounds like the 2WD dirt bike will be based off the BRD RedShift MX (shown above), and use an electric drivetrain, as well as a multi-fuel internal combustion engine to achieve its goals.

Colin Edwards Will Retire from Racing after 2014 Season

Announcing his decision during the pre-event press conference for the Red Bull Grand Prix of the Americas, Colin Edwards told the assembled press that 2014 would be the Texan’s last season racing a motorcycle. Citing a lack of improvement on his performance in pre-season testing and at the Qatar GP, Edwards decision perhaps answers the lingering question in the paddock of when the American rider would hang-up his spurs after an illustrious career in AMA, WSBK and MotoGP. Talking about his inability to come to terms with the Forward Yamaha, which Aleix Espargaro was able to take to the front of the pack in Qatar, Edwards was at a loss when it came to understanding the Open Class machine and his lack of results.

MSF Updates Its Basic RiderCourse Curriculum

It is no surprise that statistics from the NHTSA show that motorcycle accidents and injuries are on the rise. According to the 2012 Motor Vehicle Crash report published by the NHTSA, motorcycle fatalities for that year rose to 4,957, up seven percent from 2011, while injuries increased 15% to 93,000. While the NHTSA statistics are misleading because the motorcycle category includes mopeds, scooters, three-wheelers, pocket bikes, mini bikes, and off-road vehicles, new riders need every advantage they can afford. The Motorcycle Safety Foundation has taken notice of these statistics and has revised the curriculum for its Basic RiderCourse to include a new Basic eCourse, which students will take prior to in-person instruction.

Yamaha Trademarks “R1S” & “R1M” at USPTO – “YZF-R1M” Trademarked Abroad – But Why?

Are new Yamaha YZF-R1 models coming down the pipe? That’s the question being asked after trademark filings in the US and abroad tipped off Yamaha Motor’s intention to use “R1S”, “R1M”, and “YZF-R1M” for motorcycle, scooter, and three-wheeled purposes. The filings are being taken as hints towards a possible multiple trim levels of the Yamaha YZF-R1 superbike, with the “S” and “M” designations being different spec machines than the current base model. The “S” nomenclature is a popular one in the two and four-wheeled world, though “M” would certainly be a novel designation, outside of say…BMW.

Bell & COTA Create Texas-Themed Limited-Edition Helmet

Continuing its theme of making limited-edition helmets for premier-class US rounds, Bell Helmets has teamed up with the Circuit of the Americas and Chris Wood, of Airtrix, to create a Texas-themed Bell Star Carbon helmet, just in time for COTA’s MotoGP race next weekend. Available only until April 13th, the Bell/COTA helmet features a red, white, and blue flag motif on the front, with both the American and State of Texas flags visible, which then wrap around the rear to merge with a hardwood design, reminiscent of the floorboards in a Western saloon. The helmet is also crowned with a Longhorn cattle skull, which adds to the Texan motif. The specially designed helmet also features a horseshoe, the COTA logo, and the 2014 Red Bull MotoGP of The Americas logo.

Aprilia Mounting a Return to MotoGP in 2016

Towards the end of the 800cc era, MotoGP looked to be in dire condition. Grids were dwindling, factories were reducing their participation, and teams were in difficult financial straits indeed. By the end of 2011, there were just 17 full time entries, Suzuki was down to a single rider, and were about to pull out entirely for 2012. How different the situation looks today. In a recent interview with the official MotoGP.com website, Aprilia Corse’s new boss Romano Albesiano gave a brief outline of their plans. The Italian factory will continue to work with the IODA Racing team for 2014 to collect data on the electronics and tires, which they will use as input on an entirely new project being worked on for 2016.

This Is Pretty Much What the Monster 800 Will Look Like

With the advent of the Ducati Monster 1200, it was only a matter of time before Ducati’s middleweight liquid-cooled “Monster 800″ would be spotted, and unsurprisingly the machines have a great deal in common. The one big difference seems to be that the 821cc Monster gets a double-sided swingarm, which has become Ducati’s new way of differentiating between its big and medium displacement models of the same machine, see entry for Ducati 899 Panigale. With the spied Ducati Monster 800 looking ready for primetime, and a pre-fall launch isn’t out of the question. Giving us an excellent glimpse into what the Ducati Monster 800 would look like, Luca Bar has again used his Photoshop skills to render up images of the still unreleased “baby” Monster.

MotoGP Engine Usage at the Halfway Mark: Yamaha Struggling, Honda Dominating, & Ducati Managing

08/06/2013 @ 5:38 pm, by David Emmett9 COMMENTS

MotoGP Engine Usage at the Halfway Mark: Yamaha Struggling, Honda Dominating, & Ducati Managing Dani Pedrosa MotoGP Laguna Seca Jensen Beeler 4 635x423

With the 2013 MotoGP season at its halfway mark, now is a good time to take a look back and examine the engine usage for the teams and riders.

In 2012, with the engine durability regulations in their third full season, the factories appeared to have the situation pretty much under control. The only excitement arose when something unexpected happened, such as Jorge Lorenzo have an engine lunch itself after he was taken out by Alvaro Bautista at Assen last year.

For 2013, the engine allocation was reduced from six to five engines per season. Each rider now has five engines to last the entire season, for use in all timed practice sessions during each race weekend. With three seasons already under their belt, no real drama was expected, yet that is not quite how it has turned out.

While Honda and Ducati are right on course to last the season, Yamaha find themselves unexpectedly struggling. An unidentified design flaw has seen Yamaha losing motors too rapidly for comfort. Both factory Yamaha men have had an engine withdrawn, while there are question marks over the life left in one engine each allocated to Valentino Rossi and the two Monster Tech 3 Yamaha riders.

The trouble started for Yamaha with Jorge Lorenzo’s #1 engine. That showed a problem at Jerez, clearly down on power to the other engine in use. The engine was withdrawn from Lorenzo’s allocation and sent back to Japan for examination and testing, though Yamaha kept the fact that the engine had been withdrawn from both the media and from Lorenzo himself.

Once an engine is active – in practical terms, once it has been sealed and leaves the pit lane for the first time – it cannot be run anywhere except for at races. The engines have either inlet or exhaust ports sealed by the Technical Director’s staff at the end of each MotoGP event to prevent this from happening, and so by testing the engine, Yamaha had to breach the seals and withdraw it from Lorenzo’s allocation.

Lorenzo was not told until two races later, Yamaha not wishing to distract the reigning world champion from the defence of his title. Yamaha have a history of misleading Lorenzo, offering soothing words to give the Spaniard time to calm down and come to terms with an unpleasant reality.

A previous example came last year, when Lorenzo lost an engine at Assen, and Yamaha allowed him to believe that Race Direction would give him an extra engine, in clear contradiction of the rules. By the next race, at the Sachsenring, Lorenzo had accepted his lot, and understood that he would not after all be given an additional engine.

Though his #1 engine has been withdrawn, Lorenzo’s engine allocation is now more or less back on track. His #2 engine is now nearing the end of its life, while engines #3 and #4 still have plenty of sessions left on them. There may be some juggling required, but Lorenzo should make it to the end of the season without being forced to take an extra engine and suffer a penalty. If, that is, he suffers no mishaps like the one at Assen last year.

Valentino Rossi, meanwhile, appears to be in a little more trouble. Rossi had his number two engine withdrawn after Mugello, though that engine already had 28 sessions on it, and was coming to the end of its useful life. His #1 engine is more of a cause for concern. That hasn’t seen action since Mugello either, and though it is still officially available, Rossi has shown no sign of using it.

Having been used in just 18 session, it is too early for that engine to be withdrawn altogether, and Rossi has been racking up the miles on his #3 and #4 engines, with 27 and 23 sessions on them respectively. At the halfway point in the season, things are looking worryingly tight for Rossi.

Then, of course, there is the question of Yamaha’s seamless gearbox. The gearbox is to be tested at Brno this week, and if both Rossi and Lorenzo approve, the factory Yamaha men will use the new gearbox some time before the end of the season. The big question is, will the seamless gearbox require a new engine to be taken, or can it be retrofitted to the existing M1 engine.

Depending on the technology used, a seamless gearbox is physically larger than a conventional one, with the mechanism allowing two gears to be selected at the same time taking up more space than the traditional arrangement. Will that extra functionality demand new cases, and therefore a new engine, or can the new gearshift be shoehorned into the existing cases?

The third possibility is that Yamaha has been using the gearbox housing for the new seamless transmission since the beginning of the year, but have adapated their conventional transmission to use the new cases. We shall see soon enough; once Yamaha starts using the seamless gearbox, we should be able to to tell if all of the Yamahas use it, or just a single bike for each of the four men on a YZR-M1.

While the problems appear to be larger in the factory team, Cal Crutchlow and Bradley Smith also need to tread carefully. Crutchlow appears to be in the best shape of the Yamaha riders, with one engine with 30 sessions currently shelved, but three more in use.

Bradley Smith, however, has also had one engine with few sessions set aside, his #2 engine not having been on track since Mugello, and having racked up just 16 sessions, rather than the 35+ which are necessary to make it to the end of the season.

The contrast between the predicament of Yamaha and the comfort of Honda could hardly be greater. Of the four Honda riders, only Alvaro Bautista has had an engine withdrawn, his #2 motor having had its seals broken after Assen, with a healthy 38 sessions on it. All four Honda men still have two engines which have not yet been used, with just three engines each in play. And for all four Honda men, the #3 engines have barely seen much action at all, engines #1 and #2 having racked up serious mileages.

Only Honda has managed to extract more than 40 sessions out of their engines, with Dani Pedrosa and Marc Marquez having one engine each with over 40 sessions, and Stefan Bradl having two such power units. It can hardly come as a surprise that HRC should be managing their engines so proficiently: the engineering genius of Honda saw them get it right first time, with Dani Pedrosa using just five engines in the first season of engine limits, in a period when six were allowed. Only sabotage or alien invasion will prevent Honda from making it to the end of the year with miles to spare on their engines.

Much the same could be said of Ducati. Though all four Ducati riders have had engines withdrawn, the situation is still well in hand. Nicky Hayden, Ben Spies and Andrea Iannone all have low mileage on their #3 engines, helped in the case of both Spies and Iannone by missing events through injury. Andrea Dovizioso’s #3 engine is a little more used, but with 18 sessions on it, there is still plenty of life left in them. The Ducati engines appear to be able to reach 35+ sessions with relative ease, where Yamaha struggle to make 30 sessions with each engine.

Ducati’s engine situation means that all four men still have two engines each left. Ducati are known to be working on a larger upgrade to the Desmosedici, and though the frame has been the main focus of design, there is some speculation that the engine may be modified at some stage this year to make it more compact, though the 90° angle between the cylinder banks will remain. If Ducati do debut a modified engine, all four Ducati men could test it at Misano, before using them for the final five races of the season.

Looking at the CRT bikes, it is clear that they, too, are improving in their engine usage. A lot more CRT engines have been withdrawn, but only the situation of Hector Barbera is actively worrying, the Avintia Blusens rider having already had half his engines withdrawn from allocation.

What is also clear from the CRT engine allocation lists is that the Aprilia in its current state is incapable of making an entire season with just 5 engines. The current rules would allow Aprilia 9 engines, were they to return to MotoGP as an MSMA entry, and that seems a more achievable goal. Both Karel Abraham and Yonny Hernandez appear to be on target to make the season with 9 engines, though they may still use 12 this year.

The Aspar pairing of Aleix Espargaro and Randy de Puniet, both with heavy support from Aprilia, are having a little more trouble. De Puniet is looking the more comfortable of the two, having used just 6 of his engines to Espargaro’s 7, though De Puniet has had one more engine withdrawn. The question is, of course, whether Aprilia really are trying to make it to the end of the year inside of the limit which they will face next year, if they decide to race as an MSMA entry. That, too, will be clear soon enough.

Below is the full list of engine usage for each rider, with the sessions and races used on each engine. At the bottom follows a legend, explaining the various statuses and what is meant by a ‘session’.

Honda

Dani Pedrosa – Repsol Honda
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1384Shelved
Engine #2463Active
Engine #351Active
Engine #400Unused
Engine #500Unused

 

Marc Marquez – Repsol Honda
Sessions*Races*Status
Engine #1393Shelved
Engine #2424Active
Engine #381Active
Engine #400Unused
Engine #500Unused

* The engine usage chart for Marc Marquez was not complete, missing both the warm-up and the race sessions from Laguna Seca

Stefan Bradl – LCR Honda
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1404Active
Engine #2494Active
Engine #3111Active
Engine #400Unused
Engine #500Unused

 

Alvaro Bautista – Gresini Honda
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1394Active
Engine #2384WFA
Engine #3121Active
Engine #400Unused
Engine #500Unused

Yamaha

Valentino Rossi – Yamaha Factory Racing
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1180Shelved
Engine #2283WFA
Engine #3273Active
Engine #4233Active
Engine #500Unused

 

Jorge Lorenzo – Yamaha Factory Racing
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1172WFA
Engine #2321Active
Engine #3193Active
Engine #4102Active
Engine #500Unused

 

Cal Crutchlow – Tech 3 Yamaha
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1303Shelved
Engine #2221Active
Engine #3213Active
Engine #4152Active
Engine #500Unused

 

Bradley Smith – Tech 3 Yamaha
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1313Active
Engine #2160Shelved
Engine #3194Active
Engine #472Active
Engine #500Unused

Ducati

Andrea Dovizioso – Factory Ducati
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1274Active
Engine #2342WFA
Engine #3183Active
Engine #400Unused
Engine #500Unused

 

Nicky Hayden – Factory Ducati
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1306Active
Engine #2352WFA
Engine #3111Active
Engine #400Unused
Engine #500Unused

 

Ben Spies – Pramac Ducati
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1322Active
Engine #2283WFA
Engine #3132Active
Engine #400Unused
Engine #500Unused

 

Andrea Iannone – Pramac Ducati
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1305WFA
Engine #2381Active
Engine #341Active
Engine #400Unused
Engine #500Unused

CRT Bikes

Randy de Puniet – Aspar ART
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1111WFA
Engine #2183WFA
Engine #3181Active
Engine #4171Active
Engine #510WFA
Engine #653Active
Engine #700Unused
Engine #800Unused
Engine #900Unused
Engine #1000Unused
Engine #1100Unused
Engine #1200Unused

 

Aleix Espargaro – Aspar ART
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1150Active
Engine #291WFA
Engine #3171WFA
Engine #472Active
Engine #5172Active
Engine #642Active
Engine #730Active
Engine #800Unused
Engine #900Unused
Engine #1000Unused
Engine #1100Unused
Engine #1200Unused

 

Karel Abraham – Cardion AB ART
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1152WFA
Engine #290WFA
Engine #3181WFA
Engine #4192Active
Engine #562Active
Engine #600Unused
Engine #700Unused
Engine #800Unused
Engine #900Unused
Engine #1000Unused
Engine #1100Unused
Engine #1200Unused

 

Yonny Hernandez – PBM ART
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #171WFA
Engine #2221WFA
Engine #3111WFA
Engine #4152WFA
Engine #592Active
Engine #6102Active
Engine #700Unused
Engine #800Unused
Engine #900Unused
Engine #1000Unused
Engine #1100Unused
Engine #1200Unused

 

Michael Laverty – PBM Aprilia
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #190WFA
Engine #2251Active
Engine #3133WFA
Engine #4173WFA
Engine #520WFA
Engine #671Active
Engine #721Active
Engine #800Unused
Engine #900Unused
Engine #1000Unused
Engine #1100Unused
Engine #1200Unused

 

Colin Edwards – NGM Forward FTR Kawasaki
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1162WFA
Engine #271WFA
Engine #3191WFA
Engine #4265Active
Engine #560Active
Engine #630Active
Engine #700Unused
Engine #800Unused
Engine #900Unused
Engine #1000Unused
Engine #1100Unused
Engine #1200Unused

 

Claudio Corti – NGM Forward FTR Kawasaki
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1142WFA
Engine #2171WFA
Engine #341WFA
Engine #4132Shelved
Engine #5161Active
Engine #620WFA
Engine #7112Active
Engine #800Unused
Engine #900Unused
Engine #1000Unused
Engine #1100Unused
Engine #1200Unused

 

Hiroshi Aoyama – Avintia Blusens FTR Kawasaki
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #191WFA
Engine #2112WFA
Engine #3130WFA
Engine #4142WFA
Engine #541Shelved
Engine #642Active
Engine #7101Active
Engine #800Unused
Engine #900Unused
Engine #1000Unused
Engine #1100Unused
Engine #1200Unused

 

Hector Barbera – Avintia Blusens FTR Kawasaki
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1213WFA
Engine #240WFA
Engine #310WFA
Engine #470WFA
Engine #591WFA
Engine #651WFA
Engine #7132Active
Engine #8102Active
Engine #900Unused
Engine #1000Unused
Engine #1100Unused
Engine #1200Unused

 

Bryan Staring – Gresini Honda FTR Honda
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1183WFA
Engine #270Active
Engine #3284Active
Engine #4212WFA
Engine #500Shelved
Engine #600Unused
Engine #700Unused
Engine #800Unused
Engine #900Unused
Engine #1000Unused
Engine #1100Unused
Engine #1200Unused

 

Danilo Petrucci – IODA Racing Suter BMW
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1121WFA
Engine #2141WFA
Engine #361WFA
Engine #4101WFA
Engine #5141WFA
Engine #6122Active
Engine #7101WFA
Engine #831Active
Engine #900Unused
Engine #1000Unused
Engine #1100Unused
Engine #1200Unused

 

Lukas Pesek – IODA Racing Suter BMW
SessionsRacesStatus
Engine #1152WFA
Engine #220WFA
Engine #340WFA
Engine #4141WFA
Engine #5122WFA
Engine #6183Active
Engine #750Active
Engine #821Active
Engine #900Unused
Engine #1000Unused
Engine #1100Unused
Engine #1200Unused

Legend

Sessions: The number of sessions an engine has been used for. Sessions include free practice, qualifying practice, warm up and races.

Races: The number of races an engine has been used in.

Active: The current engine is still in active use. It was used in the last two races, and is likely to be used again in the coming races.

Unused: The engine has not yet been used. To be specific, the engine has not yet been sealed and exited pit lane. There are no restrictions on the engine (other than using the same bore and stroke as the previous engines) before it is sealed and used.

WFA: Withdrawn from allocation – the engine seals have been broken, and the engine is deducted from the allocation. The physical engine may be reused, but new seals must then be applied, and it will be regarded as exactly the same as a new engine as far as the rules are concerned.

Shelved: This is the only “unofficial” status. We are calling “shelved” all engines which have at one point already been active, but have not been used for at least two races. Usually, these engines have been used extensively, and are being kept back as reserve items, in case the rider starts having trouble with his engine allowance.

Source: MotoGP; Photo: © 2013 Jensen Beeler / Asphalt & Rubber – Creative Commons – Attribution 3.0

This article was originally published on MotoMatters, and is republished here on Asphalt & Rubber with permission by the author.

Comment:

  1. JW says:

    Is a race included in the session number? Or is a session separate from a race? Take the top one of Pedrosa: 38 sessions and 4 races. Does this mean the engine has been out a total of 42 events? Sorry but I need to get my head around this.

  2. phil says:

    Go back to the good old days of one engine per race!

  3. smiler says:

    “Go back to the good old days of one engine per race!”.
    Which will let costs skyrocket and help Honda win even more titles because it has the deepest pockets……

    Fascinating article. it is no wonder Lorenzo seems so focused and calm the whole time. Seems Yamahahaha wrap him in cotton wool the whole time.

    Fascinating article and well researched.

  4. TexusTim says:

    wow great artical….looks like the seamless gear box is the root of longevity and maybe the problem for yamaha…so you could extract several conclusions…1- the seamless gearbox sorted out for honda helps the engine survive…2- if yamaha is using an expanded case in preperation for the seamless gear box upgrade it maybe causing issues that wont be resolved till the additon of the new gearbox….I remember some photos or somthing about the first round and different case’s seen on the yamaha and speculation was the gearbox was in there….so I think these two tidbits may in fact show yamaha is using a modified case right now and that could be having somthing to do with it’s life span.
    no surprise on the ducati…engine life not ever being an issue, but the aprilla problems are troubling and no doubt there wringing every drop out of it..the software is very good so you have to wonder if the rules in place for crt’s let them look at the current engines as “disposable cuz they get so many..they maybe working on somtehing else and not worried about the current engine’s life span cuz it wont be the same next year…I cant help but think aprilla has got somthing else for next year in the pipeline…they cant step up with this one.

  5. Micah says:

    I believe the reason Yamaha is having engine life issues stems from their use of a cross plane inline four. Its is great for communicating feedback regarding rear grip but is an inherently unbalanced design and I suspect this would affect reliability. I would guess that for Yamaha to try to compete, in terms of power with the better balanced v-fours, they have to push their engines a little more than they would like. I expect Suzuki will have the same issues when they bring their inline four into the series, as well. I do love that Yamaha races an engine design that they also sell. I’m looking at you Honda, where’s our v-four superbike already.

  6. Norm G. says:

    re: “looks like the seamless gear box is the root of longevity and maybe the problem for Yamaha”

    nope, but the answer is right in front of you. it’s the 90 degrees of V. Honda opened up the angle for a reason. they know. they’ve always known. long live the long engine…!

  7. JW says:

    Now that I think of it, Craigslist v4 Hondas listed for sale always seem to have big miles compared to other inline configurations

  8. Damn says:

    So Yamaha cant deal with the 5 engines this year because of a designflaw. they could make it in 2012 and lose an engine in assen. So Yamaha should take the penalty’s this year and take the 2014 engine with seamless fit in this year to develop for next year. i hope honda comes up this year even with an 2015 rcv or 2016 even. if you have 500.000.000.- to spend

  9. TexusTim says:

    um yamha didnt have the same problems last year till they came out with this years bikes with the funny cases..yes the honda is more reliable thats why I own them but there is a difference between this years yamaha and last…this is what the atricla is about guys….when they get the seamless gearbox going I bet relaiabilty will follow.just the transmission will help the motor live as its less abusive on donwshift…doesnt take alot to understand that.