A 2WD Hybrid-Electric Motorcycle for the US Military?

In the coming years, US special forces may be riding a tw0-wheel drive, hybrid-electric, multi-fuel motorcycle co-developed by BRD Motorcycles and Logos Technologies. Helping make this project possible is a Small Business Innovation Research grant from DARPA. The goal is to make a single-track vehicle for US expeditionary and special forces that will be nearly silent in operation, yet also capable of traveling long distances. Details on the proposed machine are light, of course, but it sounds like the 2WD dirt bike will be based off the BRD RedShift MX (shown above), and use an electric drivetrain, as well as a multi-fuel internal combustion engine to achieve its goals.

Colin Edwards Will Retire from Racing after 2014 Season

Announcing his decision during the pre-event press conference for the Red Bull Grand Prix of the Americas, Colin Edwards told the assembled press that 2014 would be the Texan’s last season racing a motorcycle. Citing a lack of improvement on his performance in pre-season testing and at the Qatar GP, Edwards decision perhaps answers the lingering question in the paddock of when the American rider would hang-up his spurs after an illustrious career in AMA, WSBK and MotoGP. Talking about his inability to come to terms with the Forward Yamaha, which Aleix Espargaro was able to take to the front of the pack in Qatar, Edwards was at a loss when it came to understanding the Open Class machine and his lack of results.

MSF Updates Its Basic RiderCourse Curriculum

It is no surprise that statistics from the NHTSA show that motorcycle accidents and injuries are on the rise. According to the 2012 Motor Vehicle Crash report published by the NHTSA, motorcycle fatalities for that year rose to 4,957, up seven percent from 2011, while injuries increased 15% to 93,000. While the NHTSA statistics are misleading because the motorcycle category includes mopeds, scooters, three-wheelers, pocket bikes, mini bikes, and off-road vehicles, new riders need every advantage they can afford. The Motorcycle Safety Foundation has taken notice of these statistics and has revised the curriculum for its Basic RiderCourse to include a new Basic eCourse, which students will take prior to in-person instruction.

Yamaha Trademarks “R1S” & “R1M” at USPTO – “YZF-R1M” Trademarked Abroad – But Why?

Are new Yamaha YZF-R1 models coming down the pipe? That’s the question being asked after trademark filings in the US and abroad tipped off Yamaha Motor’s intention to use “R1S”, “R1M”, and “YZF-R1M” for motorcycle, scooter, and three-wheeled purposes. The filings are being taken as hints towards a possible multiple trim levels of the Yamaha YZF-R1 superbike, with the “S” and “M” designations being different spec machines than the current base model. The “S” nomenclature is a popular one in the two and four-wheeled world, though “M” would certainly be a novel designation, outside of say…BMW.

Bell & COTA Create Texas-Themed Limited-Edition Helmet

Continuing its theme of making limited-edition helmets for premier-class US rounds, Bell Helmets has teamed up with the Circuit of the Americas and Chris Wood, of Airtrix, to create a Texas-themed Bell Star Carbon helmet, just in time for COTA’s MotoGP race next weekend. Available only until April 13th, the Bell/COTA helmet features a red, white, and blue flag motif on the front, with both the American and State of Texas flags visible, which then wrap around the rear to merge with a hardwood design, reminiscent of the floorboards in a Western saloon. The helmet is also crowned with a Longhorn cattle skull, which adds to the Texan motif. The specially designed helmet also features a horseshoe, the COTA logo, and the 2014 Red Bull MotoGP of The Americas logo.

Aprilia Mounting a Return to MotoGP in 2016

Towards the end of the 800cc era, MotoGP looked to be in dire condition. Grids were dwindling, factories were reducing their participation, and teams were in difficult financial straits indeed. By the end of 2011, there were just 17 full time entries, Suzuki was down to a single rider, and were about to pull out entirely for 2012. How different the situation looks today. In a recent interview with the official MotoGP.com website, Aprilia Corse’s new boss Romano Albesiano gave a brief outline of their plans. The Italian factory will continue to work with the IODA Racing team for 2014 to collect data on the electronics and tires, which they will use as input on an entirely new project being worked on for 2016.

This Is Pretty Much What the Monster 800 Will Look Like

With the advent of the Ducati Monster 1200, it was only a matter of time before Ducati’s middleweight liquid-cooled “Monster 800″ would be spotted, and unsurprisingly the machines have a great deal in common. The one big difference seems to be that the 821cc Monster gets a double-sided swingarm, which has become Ducati’s new way of differentiating between its big and medium displacement models of the same machine, see entry for Ducati 899 Panigale. With the spied Ducati Monster 800 looking ready for primetime, and a pre-fall launch isn’t out of the question. Giving us an excellent glimpse into what the Ducati Monster 800 would look like, Luca Bar has again used his Photoshop skills to render up images of the still unreleased “baby” Monster.

Photos of the Mugen Shinden Ni sans Fairings

Given the competitive nature of the electric racing realm, its rare to see the big high-power bikes without their fairings, as teams are reluctant to reveal their secret sauce. Debuting the Mugen Shinden San this past weekend in Tokyo though, Team Mugen did just that, giving us a glimpse into the inner workings of the team’s 2013 race bike, the Mugen Shinden Ni. You don’t have to be an electron-head to get excited by these photos, as any race bike with a carbon fiber frame and swingarm is pretty drool-worthy, though the Shinden Ni’s carbon fiber battery enclosure does hide a great deal of the electric superbike’s geek factor. While the sheer size of the battery bike is impressive, it was expected when the Shinden was first announced.

Mugen Shinden San (神電 参) Electric Superbike Revealed

Mugen’s third purpose-built electric superbike for the Isle of Man TT, the Mugen Shinden San, has been revealed in Japan. Campaigning two machines for this year’s TT Zero race, Mugen has John McGuiness and Bruce Anstey at the helm of its “Shinden San” bikes, as the duo looks for a one-two finish in this year’s race. With MotoCzysz not racing at the Isle of Man this year, Mugen is a hot favorite to take the top podium spots, as well as crack the 110 mph barrier for electrics on the historic Snaefell Mountain Course (Mugen is targeting a 115 mph lap). An evolution on the company’s previous designs, the Shinden San fits 134hp — 10hp more than last year, thanks to a new smaller three-phase brushless motor provided by Mission Motors — into its 529lbs bulk.

Trackside Tuesday: The Winning Personality of Jack Miller

Chatting with a couple of NASCAR fans recently, I was reminded that any competition is boring if you don’t care who wins. But if you do care, then even cars driving around in circles can be very compelling entertainment. Those NASCAR fans really cared about how their favorite drivers finished, and not only how they finished in the latest race, but what and how those drivers were doing off the track as well. Those fans had been captured by the personalities of those drivers. One of the things NASCAR does well is sell personalities. All major sports-related businesses do this to some extent, but some organizations do it better than others.

BMW R90 Interceptor – The Last RAD Bike

01/20/2014 @ 1:10 pm, by Jensen Beeler24 COMMENTS

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 05 635x423

For the past week or so I have been stooped over in a depression, because after hearing the news that Radical Ducati would be shutting its doors after 15 years of incredible custom motorcycle building, I am just not sure if life is worth living. That’s a bit of hyperbole of course, but we are, like many, selfishly saddened to see that Pepo and Reyes will be moving onto bigger and better things.

So, it is with some irony that we bring you the last motorcycle to come from Radical Ducati — ironic because the machine is not one of RAD’s mix-matched Ducati’s, which has given the small Spanish firm such notoriety, but instead the motorcycle is a BMW, with the same unique style and flare. Dubbed the BMW R90 Interceptor, the machine is a joint project between Radical Ducati and MaxBOXER.

Noticeable right away is one of Radical Ducati’s signature tail pieces, and upon closer inspection one will see that the Interceptor sports Ducati pieces for its front-end, so not is all wrong with the world. Full of go as well as show, MaxBOXER has given the R100 motor a thorough going over, and the overall package looks quite the air-cooled business.

A bit different from the v-twins we are used to seeing from Radical Ducati, the Interceptor’s boxer engine and cafe race lines somehow still fit with the firm’s overall aesthetic. As Chris Hunter from BikeEXIF penned, the machine is a fitting swansong for Radical Ducati. We can’t agree more.

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 01 635x423

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 02 635x423

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 03 635x423

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 04 635x423

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 06 635x423

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 07 635x423

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 08 635x423

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 09 635x953

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 10 635x423

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 11 635x423

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 12 635x423

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 13 635x423

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 14 635x423

BMW R90 Interceptor   The Last RAD Bike Radical Ducati MaxBOXER BMW R90 Interceptor 15 635x423

BMW R90 Interceptor Build List:

  • Modified  BMW R80 ST frame with reinforced tubes
  • Monolever  swing arm and R100RS Monolever bevel box
  • Paralever modified (17 inches) rear wheel
  • Ducati  Monster  yokes
  • Ducati Sport Classic fork
  • Tomaselli clip-ons
  • Ducati Sport Classic spoked front wheel (17 inches)
  • Ducati Monster 900 rotors
  • Ducati Sport Classic Discacciati calipers kit.
  • Ducati Monster 900  brake pump.
  • RAD, foldable and adjustabble CNC machined levers.
  • Tomaselli quick open gas throtle
  • Suzuki GSXR 600, clutch lever
  • Carbon Fiber RAD front mudguard
  • Pantahstica front fairing
  • Custom made front bracket
  • Modified Laverda fuel tank
  • Modified carbon fiber RAD 02 Montjuich solo seat
  • Derbi GPR 50  footlevers support
  • Tarrozi foot levers
  • SuperMario 2 in 1 exhaust system
  • BMW S1000RR  silencer
  • Dell’Orto PHM 40 carburetors
  • MWR airfilter  pods
  • R100 MaxBOXER Powered Engine :
  • Crankcase reduced to minumum
  • Upper positioned on frame for more ground clearance
  • Blueprinted motor
  • Head cylinders worked and gasflowed heads with bigger intakes, big valves,
  • Head cylinder cover with rapid oil filling hole
  • High-compression and lightened pistons
  • Racing light clutch
  • Oil pan intermediate crankcase, external oil filter
  • Ducati Paso oil radiator with external hoses
  • Revised and updated gearbox with racing adjustments
  • Electrics : Racing wire, LIPO battery, Silent Hetkit electronic front crankshaft ignition with 16 mappings, electronic regulator

Source: Radical Ducati

Comment:

  1. Chris Blair says:

    Goodbye Radical Ducati, you shall be missed.

  2. SBPilot says:

    I had the most strange feeling of amazement seeing this bike. What a piece of art. So sad RAD is closing it’s doors. Their 125TS remains my background for my phone.

  3. M. Smith says:

    What a silly wannabe motorcycle.

    Foam air filters, no headlight, twin front discs and a rear drum, and best of all, a frame
    which is flexible enough to guarantee excitement in any high speed maneuvers.

    The motorcycle world is better off now that the cretins who built this joke
    are doing something else.

  4. Judge says:

    Yeah, RD are closing shop to avoid all the lawsuits forthcoming when their aluminum swingarms fall apart: http://www.asphaltandrubber.com/bikes/radical-ducati-matador/

  5. chris says:

    what? no more waiting 6 months for parts that don’t fit and are built poorly? damn.

  6. paulus says:

    Give the RAD guys some credit… they were actually doing something

    “It is not the critic who counts;………”

    ― Theodore Roosevelt

  7. Shinigami says:

    What’s next, a Honda Panigale? Kawasaki GSX-R?

    How about a Chrysler Mustang? Audi Camaro?

  8. Norm G. says:

    re: “Goodbye Radical Ducati, you shall be missed.”

    re: “Their 125TS remains my background for my phone.”

    sounds like the “pictures” of their bikes will be missed.

    question to all who keep saying they will be missed, did any of you lauding their work actually come off the dime and BUY any of their creations…?

    seems to me they spent countless hours tweaking the details on these assemblies. like ‘em or not, functional or not, not a one appears to be something thrown together slapdash…? I don’t see where heaps of praise and free photographs was keeping gas in the wife’s car, or the daughter’s tuition bill paid.

    or was all this “sweat equity” meant to be another 501C non-profit endeavour dedicated to the artistic betterment of motorcycling…? in that case the end wasn’t an “if” question, but a “when” question. like “when” with economy of Spain in tatters, we’re the wives/gf’s/families going to get tired of them screwin’ around and tell ‘em to get real jobs.

  9. Norm G. says:

    re: “Give the RAD guys some credit… they were actually doing something”

    but what did WE do that’s the question…?

  10. geokan says:

    Some silly and harsh comments here, and definitely the motorcycle world will not be better if every romantic gearhead will quit from building dream bikes :(

    If some people can’t understand the need for individual interpatation of two wheels that some passionate gearheads may have, they can go buy a commuter or whatever they want, and stop trolling…

    The moto community is colorful and openminded and there are plenty of roads for everyone.

  11. Jorge says:

    Look at the shot of the rear, that carbon tail looks like it was found in the bin.

    NCR Ducati builds some beautiful old school bikes that put this garage hack job to shame.

  12. M. Smith says:

    “:If some people can’t understand the need for individual interpatation of two wheels that some passionate gearheads may have, they can go buy a commuter or whatever they want, and stop trolling…”

    An opinion which differs from yours is a troll ? Thanks for the laughs, that is hilarious.

    The truth is that some people lack the knowledge which would permit them to understand
    when some modifications are not a good idea, and they parrot the “it’s all good” bs
    because they have no other means by which to defend their arguments.

    A motorcycle is not a hair style, it is a MACHINE. But because some people want to express
    their “individuality” we see literally dozens of formerly good bikes which now wear pipe wrap and Firestones, on absurdist sites like BikeEXIF. Those bikes will be miserable and unsafe to ride in the real world. And a real rider ( not to be confused with a hipster or a poseur ) knows this is true.

    You people who like this bike are of course entitled to your opinion. But you are wrong if you think it is a bike which stands up to engineering scrutiny. It is a misguided styling attempt that will reveal its flaws if it is ever put to serious use.

    If you want to see modded bikes which actually look good AND make good engineering sense,
    look at what Richard does at Mule. He builds beautiful machines which can actually be ridden.
    Bikes from Mule are the real deal. There is a reason he is still in business and Radical are not.

  13. L2C says:

    “Look at the shot of the rear, that carbon tail looks like it was found in the bin. “

    If the assignment was to “transform one man’s trash into another’s work of art,” then job well done.

  14. M. Smith says:

    “NCR Ducati builds some beautiful old school bikes that put this garage hack job to shame.”

    Indeed, NCR stuff is as good as it gets, though the old Bimota stuff was on the
    same level.

    NCR is about engineering, and pretenders like Radical are about styling.

    The next time you ride on a Boeing or an Airbus, think about whether you’d prefer that aircraft to have been designed by stylists or engineers, as you ride along at Mach .9, many thousands of feet above the surface of the earth.

  15. L2C says:

    “You people who like this bike are of course entitled to your opinion. But you are wrong if you think it is a bike which stands up to engineering scrutiny. It is a misguided styling attempt that will reveal its flaws if it is ever put to serious use.”

    Asking the wrong questions, providing the wrong answers.

  16. M. Smith says:

    “L2C says:
    Asking the wrong questions, providing the wrong answers.”

    Spew all you want, you’ll still be an idiot when you’re done.

  17. L2C says:

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!

  18. Chaz Michael Michaels says:

    you guys need to lighten up.

    The only thing I find odd–Jensen, how can you can rip on the West Coast Choppers guys (I fully support that, btw), but love RAD Ducati? Isnt’ chopping up bikes for form not function the same thing?

    My only objection is taking perfectly good bikes and chopping them into something that’s perfectly worthless but now costs tens of thousands of dollars more. I’m not knocking how they look. Unlike the others here, I think they look awesome. I object to their uselessness and price.

    Chop up the crashed and ratty. Like they were doing in England, or like the kids in San Francisco do now with the UJMs.–which are some of the coolest bikes I’ve seen in ages.

  19. The difference is pretty simple Chad, I don’t see any art in what OCC builds. The majority of their machines are gaudy “theme bikes” and the rest have spiderwebs and some impressive paint.

    RAD actually creates something new and unique that has visual appeal to me. I like they idea that they’re building things from the Ducati parts bin too — there’s a something new from something old quality to that.

    Not every bike has to be a “go” bike, but I do expect the “show” bikes to be visually pleasing.

  20. Judge says:

    “Not every bike has to be a “go” bike”

    WHAT!? OMG, Jensen, everything is fading, losing consciousness, can’t, breath…

    My world will never be the same.

  21. ADG says:

    You have to be kidding me! This “thing” is a POS!

  22. L2C says:

    Concept: Jizzed jeans. Artwork: Pitchforks and torches.

    Go figure.

  23. Matt Higgins says:

    This is a GREAT swansong for a great company! A simplistic design that took a lot of thought to execute. Lots to look at.

  24. Chaz Michael Michaels says:

    Jensen,

    I basically agree with you regarding OCC. However, the theme here is essentially the same: changing a bike for aesthetic reasons.

    Just because what OCC does “looks” stupid to you doesn’t make it any less stupid than what RAD does. What you decide is smart or dumb is purely subjective.

    Your point of view makes me chuckle because it reminds me of that old southern senator (can’t recall who it was, Jesse Helms?) who said he knew when pornography was offensive when he saw it.

    So, sorry my friend. If you like RAD then you must come out of the closet as a OCC lover.